indicators of compromise

The Truth Is That Threat Hunting Is More Art Than Science

Threat detection relies on signatures or the correlation of system events to identify indicators of compromise (IOCs). As such, it is primarily reactive and used to verify if a breach has occurred, and to assess the scope and spread of a threat. This article explains how proactive threat hunting can address this inherent weakness in threat detection by assuming a threat or threat actor has not been detected, yet may have targeted an organization.

Spotting Attackers Early Means Being More Protected

KRACK, as acronyms go, seemed an appropriate handle for last month’s WiFi security disclosure. After a quarter stuffed with bad security news, a new flaw in one of our most beloved technologies might have a few security pros on the verge of cracking. The showiest security disasters make news, but breaches happen every day to organizations of every type around the world. The attacker perpetrating the next big cybersecurity incident is probably already behind someone’s firewall. And while you should definitely patch your vulnerabilities and maybe even turn off your WiFi (ok, just kidding, no one’s going to turn off the WiFi), that’s not going to be enough. We need to change how we think about cybersecurity.

The Five Step Ransomware Defense Playbook

You can increase the likelihood of successfully defending against—or at least mitigating the effects of—an attack, by understanding what happens at each phase of a ransomware attack, and knowing the indicators of compromise (IoCs) to look for.

They All Look Cute, Until You Analyze Security Posture Data

We can learn a lot about a vendor by looking at external indicators of compromise. But, are we getting the whole picture or just framing the risk at the moment?